Enhance Genetics

Steroids forum, anabolic board, fitness talk, bodybuilding discussions

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Ian Spanier

Look at this guy, George Brown. Check out those abs. He’s just a genetic freak, a men’s physique version of Dexter Jackson. To get a midsection that great, he probably doesn’t even train abs—they just come naturally for him, right?

Wrong.

Brown has been hammering his abs every other day for more than four years now. And the virtually flawless six-pack you see here is the fruit of that labor.

“Some people might think I don’t have to work hard for my abs and that they just come easy, but that’s not the case,” says the 36-year-old from Columbus, OH. “You still have to work for them. You have to have a good diet, and you still have to hit them in the gym. I may have some genes working with me, but I put in the same amount of work, if not more, as the next person. You can have all the talent in the world, but if you don’t put it to use, the person who wants it more will outwork you every single time.”

Brown’s hard-earned, crazy-chiseled six-pack went a long way in helping him become a major player in the IFBB Men’s Physique division, in which a razor-sharp midsection is a prerequisite to being competitive. Brown hits abs for 20 to 25 minutes three to four days a week. Every ab routine is different in terms of exercise selection, but one constant in his training is high-rep sets, typically in the 30-plus-rep range. Another key variable is persistence.

“I had to work up to high reps,” Brown says. “It’s taken me four years, and I’m still trying to perfect my reps. I just want quality reps. So if you have to start out at 10 reps, make sure it’s the perfect 10. You’ve got to leave your pride at the door, because eventually you’ll be doing numbers you never thought you would.”

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Ian Spanier

BENCH SCISSOR KICK

Sit sideways on a at bench, lean your...
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Per Bernal

PHIL HEATH WINS A LOT

Starting with his first show in 2003, he’s 17-7, and he’s finished atop the bodybuilding world at the last seven Mr. Olympias. He’s won so much this decade it’s hard to remember him ever losing. But no one is a born winner. Success is a mindset that needs to be learned, practiced, and perfected. Phil Heath tells you how he did that and does that. These are not just lessons for bodybuilding success. Together, they’re a winning strategy for everything.

LEARN FROM YOUR LOSSES

Things came easily for Heath at first. In his only loss in the NPC, he still won his class. He turned pro on his singular try at the 2005 USA and then won his initial two pro shows in 2006. But he was still just a puppy—if a really good one. At 5'9", he could’ve competed in the 212 division—if there had been one. He was winning with shape and conditioning, but he was undersized, and that was exposed in 2007 at the Arnold Classic. “On this bigger stage, the 27-year-old simply didn’t have enough,” I wrote about Heath then, after praising his conditioning as the best in the lineup and before singling out his legs as especially weak. He finished fifth. Afterward, many wondered if he was already maxing out and if he’d ever have enough for the Arnold title, let alone the Olympia.

A little less than a year later, Heath shut up every critic when he stepped onstage at the Ironman Pro at a peeled 230. Bodybuilding, meet your future. For a year, Heath had replayed that humbling Arnold loss and the resulting criticism and used it to fuel his workouts. There was no way he was ever again going to flex weighing less than 225. Every day was focused on his workouts and his meals. He was determined to become a unicorn, that thing they said didn’t exist—the advanced bodybuilder who thoroughly transforms his physique in a single year. He never would’ve done it had he stubbornly stuck to what had already...
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Check out exclusive behind-the-scenes content and interviews with Olympia champs.

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Hi MarilynHet,

Welcome to Enhance Genetics.
Thursday afternoon UFC superstar Conor McGregor tweeted out a trailer for his new movie scheduled to be released this November. Click over to conormcgregorfilm.com to learn more. Witness the unstoppable rise of one of the most iconic stars on the planet. Visit Conor McGregor: Notorious: Home | Universal Studios to find out more. pic.twitter.com/pWJc4zrbdA — Notorious: The Film (@McGregorFilm) October 5, 2017 IN CINEMAS WORLDWIDE THIS NOVEMBER!! https://t.co/yYo3dJ7yHl — Conor McGregor (@TheNotoriousMMA) October 5, 2017 Read the Full Article Here

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Ok seriously... how did Marky Mark, the punk ass wuss, turn into the dude from The Italian Job and Lone Survivor?

I still don't have permission to post a picture after more than 2k posts, but let's see if I can put up a link;

Hi Musclemechanic76,

Welcome to Enhance Genetics.
Hi tutelagroup,

Welcome to Enhance Genetics.
QUESTION

AT PRO AND AMATEUR CONTESTS, YOU SEE DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO THE FRONT AND BACK DOUBLE BICEPS POSE. WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON ERRORS IN DOING THESE POSES THAT CAN IMPACT HOW YOU APPEAR TO THE JUDGING PANEL?

ANSWER

STEVE WEINBERGER: There are many errors that can be made in every pose, but one of the most common in the front and back double biceps poses is not exing the legs.

That may sound odd, considering the name of the pose. However, just because the pose is called a “double biceps,” this does not mean that the lower body is not important. Every pose involves the whole body, and the legs are just as important as the upper body.

Other common errors in executing a show-stopping front double biceps is the positioning of the arms—guys will bend their elbow too much or too little, which affects how the muscle responds. In addition, you want the height of the elbows up and out to the sides when in full flexion. I also see competitors leaving their gut distended, hunching their shoulders, and not picking up their chest.

In the back double biceps, though, the most common error— apart from forgetting to flex the hamstrings and glutes during it—is not opening up the back to its full width. As in the front double biceps, the arms must be held in the correct position to best show off the biceps, triceps, and shoulders.

Posing is an art and a skill that needs to be correctly practiced over many hours, prior to every contest.

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Per Bernal

QUESTION

I’M AN AMATEUR BIKINI COMPETITOR WHO WANTS TO TRY MY HAND AT FIGURE. WHAT ARE THE BIGGEST ONSTAGE MISTAKES TO AVOID IN MAKING THE SWITCH?

ANSWER

SANDY WILLIAMSON: When making the switch from bikini to figure,...
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Pavel Ythjall

Imagine a typical workout in which you pyramid sets of bench presses or squats, relaxing for two or three minutes between each progressively shorter set. That’s a slow jam mixed with brief bursts of heavy metal. Now imagine a workout in which you never stop as you rush from one seemingly random exercise to the next, eight in all, each for at least 10 reps. And when you finish those eight you start all over again. And then again and again. It’s a 140-beats-per-minute trance mix, constant movement, forever up-tempo, relentless.

CARDIO COMBOS

Circuit training is that trance mix. It’s nothing like your typical workout, and, depending on your goals, that may be a great thing. A circuit usually consists of six to 10 exercises that together cover a wide area: upper half, lower half, or full body. Exercises are usually performed for at least 10 reps, and they’re selected to maximize the aerobic effect. So compound lifts, like squats, are superior to isolation lifts, like leg extensions. And some, like burpees, may be done only to elevate the heart rate.

Most bodybuilders compartmentalize cardio and weight training in order to hoist heavy metal with maximum intensity. This is a perfectly good strategy, but it’s not the only one. Circuiting allows you to combine cardio and weights while also working broad areas together. In that way, it’s a tremendous time-saver. In fact, by circuiting, you can crank out an effective cardio/weight full-body workout in less than an hour. In contrast, if you hit each body part individually and tack a cardio session onto each workout, it might take more than 10 times longer than a single circuit session.

That said, circuit training is not ideal for gaining size or strength long term. The rest periods are too short, and the primary focus is on continuous movement, not muscle stimulation. You’ll need to slow your circuits down considerably to speed up...